Los Cobanos

With the only tourists in sight, we jumped off our old American yellow school bus into the dirt track at the edge of Los Cobanos. Not being suddenly bombarded by touts, taxi’s and tourette driven money changers was a breath of fresh air, and we were soon realizing that El Salvador is an often missed out gem in the backpacker circuit. The minus side however is that Spanish speaking is a must when you’re trying to find a hostel of choice, or directions to somewhere that can house two weary travellers for a couple of nights. On the plus side though, everyone is so helpful and friendly it wasn’t long before we were walking along the beach, stepping over the ropes that were holding boats at bay along the coast, through dark shack alleyways that lined the ocean-lapping sand and through to the other side of this isolated fishing village to one of the hostels that the Bible (the Lonely Planet) mentioned. We were quickly shown our room (a dorm to ourselves) on this beach fronted ‘probably-was-beautiful-when-it-was-built-20-years-ago-but-is-now-a-bit-in-need-of-repair-and-love’ hostel, just in time for sunset and some pupusa’s on the beach. Please specify a Flickr ID for this gallery The fishing village of Los Cobanos is small, so small in fact that you can wander its 2km length in 20mins, and it could be roughly described as two distinct parts; the slightly more upmarket shack esque ‘bars’ and hotels, and the slightly more down-to-earth fisherman’s wharf, both of which are comprised of walking along the beach, or through and around its shacks and houses that are thrown up randomly along the coast. The fisherman’s wharf gives you cheaper food, real hard-graft life and straight-from-the-ocean fish sales, along with some stares and laughs, where as the other...